covid-19

The Atlantic
"Both at home and abroad, labor is the ghost in the machine. The supply chain is really just people, running sewing machines or loading pallets or picking tomatoes or driving trucks."
This is a good explanation of the seemingly random supply chain disruptions that keep showing up.
npr.org
"Crisis care standards mean that scarce resources such as ICU beds will be allotted to the patients most likely to survive. Other patients will be treated with less effective methods or, in dire cases, given pain relief and other palliative care."
This is happening in the United States of America because Republicans are actively undermining public health efforts.
New York Times
"One in four hospitals now reports more than 95 percent of I.C.U. beds occupied — up from one in five last month. Experts say it can become difficult to maintain standards of care for the sickest patients in hospitals where all or nearly all I.C.U. beds are occupied."
This was preventable.
apnews.com
"Republican legislators in more than half of U.S. states, spurred on by voters angry about lockdowns and mask mandates, are taking away the powers that state and local officials use to protect the public against infectious diseases."
Republicans want people to die. If they didn't want to maximize deaths from the pandemic, how would their actions be different? The Republican party sure looks like a death cult from the outside.
New York Times
"The odds of having long-term symptoms — lasting at least four weeks after infection — were also 49 percent lower in the breakthrough group."
So we’ve got that going for us. Which is nice.
sfchronicle.com
"The rash of infections highlights just how contagious the delta variant is, underscoring “the importance of vaccinating school staff members who are in close indoor contact with children ineligible for vaccination as schools reopen,” the CDC report said."
Delta is different for kids and I'm not sure that message is getting out.

See Also: A CDC-funded simulation projects that without masking or testing, more than 75 percent of children could be infected within three months.
Washington Post
"About two out of ten unvaccinated employees said if their employer gave them paid time off they’d be more likely to get vaccinated, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey of 1,888 adults conducted from June 8 to June 21."
It would be ironic if America's protestant work ethic is what ultimately did us in.
Esquire
"Instead, we’re placing our kids—the only population in this country that is 100 percent unvaccinated—in the direct path of this whirling monstrosity. By insisting on in-person school this year, we're asking them to spend six hours a day indoors with their unvaxxed peers and hoping that they won’t get blown away."
Yes, school feels like a game of chicken this time around against a virus that doesn’t blink.

See Also: Dan Sinker's article in The Atlantic, Parents Are Not Okay.
Bloomberg
"For weeks Oregon health officials have warned that COVID-19 cases, fueled by the highly transmissible delta variant, would fill hospitals by September if infection rates didn't slow significantly. Now, a little more than halfway through the month of August, 94% of the state’s hospital beds for adults and 93% of ICU beds are full."
Vaccination rates are high in many counties. 65% of 18+ have received both doses in Oregon but it’s not enough.
latimes.com
"The burden of this pandemic now rests on the shoulders of the unvaccinated. On those who are eligible to get vaccinated, but choose not to, a decision they defend by declaring, “vaccination is a deeply personal choice.” But perhaps never in history has anyone’s personal choice impacted the world as a whole as it does right now. When hundreds and thousands of people continue to die, when the most vulnerable members of society, our children, cannot be vaccinated — the luxury of choice ceases to exist."
The Atlantic
"Although, statistically, counties and states with higher vaccination rates have lower case counts and hospitalization rates, they have still become areas with high levels of community spread."
Excellent summary of what we know about the current covid wave.
NYMag
"I think the problem we have is people — whether it’s the CDC or the people that are doing the briefings — their big concern is, they just want to get vaccinations up. And they don’t want to punch any holes in the story about vaccines. But we can handle the truth. And that’s what we should be getting."
The CDC is dropping the ball by not collecting data about breakthrough cases.
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