oregon

Bloomberg
"For weeks Oregon health officials have warned that COVID-19 cases, fueled by the highly transmissible delta variant, would fill hospitals by September if infection rates didn't slow significantly. Now, a little more than halfway through the month of August, 94% of the state’s hospital beds for adults and 93% of ICU beds are full."
Vaccination rates are high in many counties. 65% of 18+ have received both doses in Oregon but it’s not enough.
oregonlive.com
“Oregon is facing a spike in COVID-19 hospitalizations––consisting overwhelmingly of unvaccinated individuals––that is quickly exceeding the darkest days of our winter surge,” Brown said in a written statement Wednesday. “When our hospitals are full, there will be no room for additional patients needing care––whether for COVID-19, a heart attack or stroke, a car collision, or a variety of other emergency situations. If our hospitals run out of staffed beds, all Oregonians will be at risk.”
This was also avoidable.
The Benton County Courthouse
Corvallis Courthouse
Coquille River Lighthouse
theconversation.com
"For decades, one of the most striking and predictable patterns of human behavior in the western U.S. has been people accidentally starting fires on the Fourth of July. From 1992 to 2015, more than 7,000 wildfires started in the U.S. on July 4 – the most wildfires ignited on any day during the year. And most of these are near homes."
With wildfires already burning in California and Oregon, this is a good year to get creative and find other ways to celebrate on the 4th.
apnews.com
"I’m seeing probably the worst combination of conditions in my lifetime,” said Derrick DeGroot, a county commissioner in southern Oregon’s Klamath County. “We have an enormous fuel load in the forests, and we are looking at a drought unlike we’ve seen probably in the last 115 years.” Asked how worried he is about the 2021 fire season, DeGroot said: “On a scale of 1 to 10, I’m a 12. Nothing looks good."
Yikes.
New York Times
"The way I’ve framed the thought experiment in recent conversations is this: Imagine, tomorrow, an alien craft crashed down in Oregon. There are no life-forms in it. It’s effectively a drone. But it’s undeniably extraterrestrial in origin. So we are faced with the knowledge that we’re not alone, that we are perhaps being watched, and we have no way to make contact. How does that change human culture and society?"
This scenario is a little too specific. I'm in Oregon and now I'm worried. What does Ezra Klein know?
a street lined with yellow and red trees
Fall Street
Trees with fall colors along a curved street
Fall Color
abandoned cement structure in the woods
dischenge
a path through trees with early fall colors
Path
gazettetimes.com
"Our students in general have been extremely mindful of health issues and I hope that continues, not only for students but for community members throughout the county."
No, the university made the decision to open campus in a pandemic with full knowledge that outbreaks are happening at campuses across the country. They are risking the health of the community and they shouldn’t frame it as up to the students.
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