Posts tagged politics

Impeachment News

Impeachment, right? Since I've been in this timeline for quite a while now it's tough for me to remember that we are in a historic moment for our democracy that I should pay attention to. As with all things online, I'm trying to batch my attention instead of drip-feeding during all waking hours. And with the public impeachment hearings starting tomorrow, I thought I'd share two resources for batching that I've found helpful:

Impeachment.fyi is an afternoon newsletter with the news of the day. In the same spirit as WTFJHT, it's a great concise summary with just the right amount of shock.

For a higher level view of what impeachment means I really like Ezra Klein's podcast Impeachment, explained. I feel ike Ezra is earnestly trying to make sense of things and talking with experts to help him. I think I'm getting a better sense of the process following Ezra's process here.

The information intensity is only going to ramp up from here. You can't go wrong adding these.
The Guardian The Guardian
image from The Guardian
Captain America: The First Antifa. He is depicted in the first Captain America comic literally punching Hitler. Art Spiegelman of Maus fame talks about the history of comics and why Marvel Comics’ modern stance on staying “apolitical” might in fact be political. Spiegelman recently pulled an introduction he wrote for a golden age collection because Marvel didn't want to offend. Newsweek: 'Maus' Author Removed from Marvel Collection for Calling Trump 'Orange Skull'.
slate.com slate.com
image from slate.com
Like the Ogilvy company meeting a few weeks ago, this is an inside look at employees pushing back against management decisions. It's fascinating to get insight into debates around language at a major media outlet like this. Language defines how we interpret the world, so this conversation is like watching people determine what is real.
The Atlantic The Atlantic
image from The Atlantic
Eric Schlosser of Fast Food Nation fame makes an important point here about the Mississippi immigration raids and immigration patterns in general. They have been driven by the business need for cheaper, less organized labor.
Vox Vox
The spectacle is merciless but can the media change that fact with selective attention? I like Ezra Klein's thought here:
"Perhaps offense and bigotry should be understood as Trump’s baseline — newsworthy, just as the central projects of other leaders are newsworthy, but not worthy of blanket coverage upon every utterance."
I also think this is partly what Beto O'Rourke was challenging when he lost his cool with the media: ‘What the F*ck?’ Is Right. The media feigning suprise at every new racist comment has worn thin.
The New Yorker The New Yorker
image from The New Yorker
"It is the choice between thinking that whatever is happening in reality is, by definition, acceptable, and thinking that some actual events in our current reality are fundamentally incompatible with our concept of ourselves..."
I think this is an important concept that I'm trying to understand. I wish there was a term for this idea: If the problem was really bad someone would have stopped it already. My hunch is this line of thinking is pervasive.
washingtonpost.com washingtonpost.com
Nice to see a tech company prioritizing something other than growth at all costs. Good for Salesforce for acting when our governments are failing us.
New Republic
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"'Electability' is a way to get voters to carry out a contrary agenda—not their own—while convincing them they’re being 'responsible.'"
I think this article is getting at a central problem with Democratic thinking right now. I agree that it’s impossible to know other people’s minds and trying to read minds (or public opinion) hurts my own ability to reason.
Vox Vox
image from Vox
I’m on board with this plan. Take a look if you haven’t seen it yet. I’m even more on board with the widespread online mocking of this type of reaction to it: Elizabeth Warren's plan to cancel student loan debt would be a slap in the face to all those who struggled to pay off their loans. My favorite response from @petridishes: "this plan to stop slapping people in the face is a slap in the face to all those who were slapped in the face."
latimes.com latimes.com
image from latimes.com
I agree with this. Repeating a frame or an idea—even to mock it—distributes and strengthens that idea. I love Colbert but I stopped watching a long time ago. Laughing wasn't enough to make up for the disturbing source material. It reminds me again that the old Internet cliché don't feed the trolls is something the media hasn't adopted yet. See also the great way Jay Smooth put it: Don't Link to the Line Steppers.
Medium Medium
image from Medium
Dave Pell asks us to vote against hate. Bonus link: Vote for Democrats Everywhere by Brent Simmons. Bonus link 2: Your vote determines the future of others by Sarah Kendzior. Bonus link 3: Why I, a young person, probably won’t vote by Alexandra Petri. Bonus link 4: Nancy. Voters get ice cream.
medium.com Medium
image from medium.com
Here's another great article by linguist George Lakoff about our current media environment. It's frustrating to see the same dynamics play out over and over again. It's like seeing legacy code in action while lives depend on refactoring. Two other folks I tune into for analysis of the media are Ezra Klein and Jay Rosen and they recently had a conversation about what's happening now. Also also, don't miss Klein's article about Enemy of the People. And after you digest all of that important garbage, a reminder from Warren Ellis: You can tune your Internet connection until it is useful and fun.
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