music

Pedalscrolling

I have been known to doomscroll at all hours of the night. It's not healthy and I've been pretty successful switching to the iOS Books app for insomnia reading. (Recently enjoyed the encyclopedic rhythm of Revolution in the Head about every Beatles track.)

Sometimes visuals are a better distraction than reading and for those times I like pedalscrolling. Guitar pedals are just metal boxes. They modify the signal from an electric guitar to add distortion, reverb, compression, or dozens of other effects before the signal gets amplified. They house a circuit board and include switches and knobs to control the effect. Sure I'm in the market for guitar pedals so it is shopping, but I also appreciate them as objects. Some are hand crafted with baroque art between components. Some are mass produced and extremely utilitarian. Some play with both of those expectations. They're small user interfaces and this wide variety of design makes them fun to browse.

I recently collected a bunch of guitar pedal manufacturer websites so I could randomly scroll through some pedals whenever I need to:



I'm sure there are more, but this is a good start. Thought I'd share. Here's to less doomscrolling.
CNN
’I probably went through maybe 300 Gretsch images and I got pretty good at it so I could see them and I could know right away that it wasn't it,’ he said. ‘So it's eliminate, eliminate, eliminate, eliminate.’
This story has it all! And by all I mean classic guitars, classic rock, internet sleuthery, and people being nice.
vinylsleeves.tumblr.com
Fun gallery of vintage record sleeves. [via webcurios]
spectator.co.uk
"A sense of awe is almost exclusively predicated on our limitations as human beings. It is entirely to do with our audacity as humans to reach beyond our potential."
AI lacks nerve is a fantastic way to put it. [via om]
lost-in-crystal-canyons.tumblr.com
For all your salacious guitar photography needs.

Cut Chemist Funk

Dang, watching Cut Chemist work is like watching magic. The whole thing is amazing but if you can't watch the whole thing go to 6:45 and watch him building layers. One turntable!

And for old time's sake: Cut Chemist Suite by Ozomatli. (The nostalgia is strong with this one.)
archive.culturalequity.org
"The Lomax Digital Archive provides free access to audio/visual collections compiled across seven decades by folklorist Alan Lomax (1915–2002) and his father John A. Lomax (1867–1948)."
Fascinating folk music archive to wander through.
lofi.cafe
Go here for classic beats to relax/study to but with several channels you can flip through. Pro tip: hit L on your keyboard to tell the interface to relax a bit.

Music: Fly Me to the Moon

Meditative GarageBand fun. Inspired to attempt this by my favorite version of this song by Groove Armada.

Music: Breathe (Pink Floyd Cover)

This was fun to noodle on over the last few months. I studied Ewan Cunningham's drums cover and played them on a midi drum pad over three tracks. I also watched HarryAndAGuitar's Breathe video several times to see how he played a few parts. Pretty quiet at the beginning so you'll have to add your own heartbeat and screams, sorry.

Music: Just a Little Rain Song

I haven't had a chance to mess around in GarageBand recently so I thought I'd release one from the vaults. Listening through the basement tapes from last September I found this version of The Rain Song. It's me struggling through the alternate tuning on acoustic, the electric guitar on lead vocals, and my favorite mellotron sound on strings. Apologies to Zeppelin.

Music: Shape Note Orchestral

Shape note music is hard to describe. It's protestant a capella hymns from the 1800s that were written in an unusual music notation that was meant to be easier for people to read. Singing in a shape note group is a great experience and I recommend it even if hymns aren't your regular cup of tea. I found a video on YouTube that explains shape note singing in a way that's very similar to my experience: Art Zone: Kevin Barrans explains Sacred Harp singing.

I've been missing the music so I arranged a few of the songs in GarageBand and thought I'd share:

Africa by William Billings
Poland by Timothy Swan
Antioch by F.C. Wood
If you're curious about what shape note music is supposed to sound like, there are many examples on YouTube. Here are versions of these songs: Africa, Poland, and Antioch.

Really looking forward to a time when it's safe for people to get together and sing.
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